Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Daughters of the Nile by Stephanie Dray

Daughters of the Nile is the final book in Stephanie Dray's trilogy about Cleopatra Selene, the daughter of Cleopatra and Marc Antony. In this part of the story Selene and her husband, King Juba II, finally enter into a marriage that is personal as well as political. They must learn to rule together to hold Mauretania and their children out of the reach of Augustus Caesar.

In my review of Lily of the Nile, the first book in this trilogy, I said that Dray reminded me of how much I enjoy historical fiction. Daughters of the Nile again reminds me of that fact. I think much of this has to do with Dray's writing. While I was reading this book I was completely immersed in Selene's world. The sights, smells, sounds, emotions, rituals, politics - I was caught up in it all. Dray uses language that is appropriate for the time period and the characters. Her words flowed around me and when I was interrupted it took a moment for me to return to the modern world.

In each book Selene has grown as a person and a woman. She enters Rome a frightened child, leaves a queen, and returns again queen and mother. She moves from dreams of her own importance as queen to protecting her children and listening to their dreams as well. Her heart which was hardened in her childhood opens to her husband, her children, and her new country. Although she will never return to rule Egypt, Selene rules Mauretania with wisdom and care for its people.

While Daughters of the Nile is the end of the story, it could be read as a stand alone novel. This is no small feat considering the trilogy spans the majority of Cleopatra Selene's lifetime.

Buy Books by Stephanie Dray on Amazon

I received a copy of Daughters of the Nile from the author for review purposes. Amazon affiliate links are used within this post.
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